Plasmodiophora brassicae (pbe3.h15)

Plasmodiophora brassicae Assembly and Gene Annotation

About Plasmodiophora brassicae

Wikipedia

220px|thumb|Clubroot on cauliflower Clubroot is a common disease of cabbages, broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, radishes, turnips, stocks, wallflowers and other plants belonging to the family Brassicaceae (Cruciferae). It is caused by Plasmodiophora brassicae, which was once considered a slime mold but is now put in the group Phytomyxea. It is the first Phytomyxea for which the genome has been sequenced. It has as many as thirteen races. Gall formation or distortion takes place on latent roots and gives the shape of a club or spindle. In the cabbage such attacks on the roots cause undeveloped heads or a failure to head at all, followed often by decline in vigor or by death. It is an important disease, affecting an estimated 10% of the total cultured area worldwide.

Historical reports of clubroot date back to the 13th century in Europe. In the late 19th century, a severe epidemic of clubroot destroyed large proportions of the cabbage crop in St. Petersburg. The Russian scientist Mikhail Woronin eventually identified the cause of clubroot as a "plasmodiophorous organism" in 1875, and gave it the name Plasmodiophora brassicae.

In 18th, 19th and early 20th century Britain clubroot was sometimes called finger and toe, fingers and toes, anbury, or ambury, these last two also meaning a soft tumor on a horse.

The potential of cultural practices to reduce crop losses due to clubroot is limited, and chemical treatments to control the disease are either banned due to environmental regulations or are not cost effective. Breeding of resistant cultivars therefore is a promising alternative.

(Text from Wikipedia, the free encyclopaedia.)

More information

General information about this species can be found in Wikipedia.

Statistics

Summary

Assemblypbe3.h15, INSDC Assembly GCA_001049375.1,
Database version97.1
Base Pairs24,050,826
Golden Path Length24,050,826
Genebuild byENA
Genebuild methodGenerated from ENA annotation
Data sourceSLU

Gene counts

Coding genes9,727
Non coding genes186
Small non coding genes184
Long non coding genes2
Gene transcripts9,913

About this species